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Table 2 Relative mortality risk and 95% confidence intervals within 5 years of follow-up between subjects reporting diabetes as a chronic illness in the Swedish Living Conditions Survey 1980–2004 and those not reporting diabetes.

From: Improved survival in both men and women with diabetes between 1980 and 2004 – a cohort study in Sweden

Sex/Period Model 1 Model 2 Model 3 Model 4
Males     
   1980–1984 3.28 (2.72 – 3.96) 2.04 (1.69 – 2.46) 2.08 (1.73 – 2.52) 1.93 (1.60 – 2.33)
   1985–1989 3.46 (2.81 – 4.26) 2.13 (1.73 – 2.63) 2.17 (1.76 – 2.68) 2.07 (1.68 – 2.55)
   1990–1994 3.52 (2.80 – 4.44) 2.28 (1.81 – 2.88) 2.29 (1.82 – 2.89) 2.22 (1.76 – 2.79)
   1995–1999 4.11 (3.26 – 5.17) 2.51 (2.00 – 3.17) 2.54 (2.02 – 3.20) 2.42 (1.93 – 3.05)
   2000–2004 3.35 (2.60 – 4.30) 2.09 (1.63 – 2.69) 2.12 (1.65 – 2.73) 1.97 (1.53 – 2.53)
Females     
   1980–1984 4.52 (3.72 – 5.49) 2.47 (2.03 – 3.00) 2.51 (2.07 – 3.06) 2.39 (1.97 – 2.91)
   1985–1989 5.05 (4.07 – 6.25) 2.77 (2.24 – 3.43) 2.80 (2.26 – 3.47) 2.69 (2.17 – 3.33)
   1990–1994 5.35 (4.20 – 6.81) 2.43 (1.91 – 3.10) 2.49 (1.96 – 3.18) 2.44 (1.91 – 3.11)
   1995–1999 2.77 (2.04 – 3.76) 1.45 (1.07 – 1.98) 1.47 (1.08 – 2.00) 1.41 (1.04 – 1.92)
   2000–2004 3.52 (2.61 – 4.75) 1.90 (1.40 – 2.56) 1.92 (1.42 – 2.59) 1.80 (1.33 – 2.43)
Model 1: crude model
Model 2: controlling for age
Model 3: controlling for age, daily smoking, and socioeconomic status
Model 4: controlling for age, daily smoking, socioeconomic status, CHD and hypertension1
  1. Non-diabetics as reference.
  2. 1. ICD-9: 401–429 Hypertension and coronary heart disease.