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Table 4 Cox regression models for the effects of metabolic syndrome on the incidence of diabetes in study subjects with central obesity or without central obesity

From: Central obesity is important but not essential component of the metabolic syndrome for predicting diabetes mellitus in a hypertensive family-based cohort. Results from the Stanford Asia-pacific program for hypertension and insulin resistance (SAPPHIRe) Taiwan follow-up study

  Incidence of diabetes
  Without central obesity (n=361) With central obesity (n=234)
  HR 95% CI P HR 95% CI P
Hypertension 1.61 (0.86,3.00) 0.137 1.46 (0.71,3.00) 0.309
Low HDL cholesterol 1.69 (0.92,3.09) 0.090 1.11 (0.63,1.98) 0.714
Hypertriglyceridemia 1.17 (0.56,2.44) 0.682 2.34 (1.44,3.80) 0.001
Impaired fasting glucose 1.83 (0.77,4.33) 0.168 3.00 (1.63,5.54) <0.001
  1. Adjusted for age, gender, smoking and waist circumference.
  2. Abbreviations: CI = confidence interval, HDL= high-density lipoprotein, HR = hazard ratio.